First Woman to win an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, & Tony?

In honor of Women’s History Month, I’d like to take some time out to highlight Helen Hayes.

Helen Hayes

Hayes accomplished all of this by 1976! What an inspiration!

Kudos from all of us at TCIR!

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SXSW

SXSW has come majestically swinging around yet another year.

If you didn’t know, SXSW is 2 weeks of an incredible combo of music, film, and technology usually held in Austin, TX. A realm of discovery on many levels, SXSW helps artists and creators grow personally and professionally.

Obviously, the women of TCIR are missing out but we’ll work it out for next year.

SO MANY ARTISTS that I don’t even want to being naming in fear that I may forget some.

THERE are still a couple days left, if you can make one of their 5,000+ events, go for it.

Head over to SXSW.com for the schedule!

Luckily, the good people at Forbes gives us some insight on how to enjoy SXSW from afar! 

 

500 Great Books by Women by Erica Beurmeister, Jesse Larsen, and Holly Smith

Awesome find! AHorseAndACarrot is awesome!

ahorseandacarrot

Title: 500 Great Books by Women
Authors: Erica Bauermeister, Jesse Larsen, Holly Smith
Published: 1994
Genre: Reference
Pages: 387
Rating: ***
500 great books by womenHere is an articulate guide to more than 500 books written by women, a unique resource that allows readers the joy of discovering new authors as well as revisiting familiar favorites. Organized by such themes as Art, Choices, Families, Growing Old, Growing Up, Places and Homes, Power, and Work, this reference book presents classic and contemporary works, from Lady Nijo’s thirteenth-century Japanese court diaries to books by authors including Toni Morrison, Alice Hoffman, Nadine Gordimer, and Isabel Allende. With annotated entries that capture the flavor of each book and seven cross-referenced indexes, 500 Great Books by Women is a one-of-a-kind guide for all reference readers and book lovers that celebrates and recommends some of the very best writings by women. (from the back cover)
Thoughts: As this is a reference book…

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PreOrder Ready – David Sedaris

Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls will be released on April 23rd, 2013. It’s available for Pre-Order through Amazon currently. This highly anticipated book from reader favorite David Sedaris is already making waves. 

It’s an essay compilation book, which seems to be the trend for popular books recently, is supposedly hilariously dark and observant and the cover is beautiful as well. I’m looking forward to this release, I’m sure I’ll be happy I did. 

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Review – This is How You Lose Her

When I first read The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, I fell in love as I turned the pages; not only with Junot Diaz’s writing style but of his accurate telling of a story that could have happened to so many of us.

By “us”, I mean Caribbean People.

It’s hard to find a writer now-a-days that would even venture onto the topics that we endeavor to sweep under the carpet in Caribbean house holds so when I heard about This is How You Lose Her, I was sprung all over again.

Like Drown, this book is about Yunior who we first meet as the room mate to the protagonist in The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. Yunior is a proud, inadvertent sucio and his story was not unlike others that I’d witnessed in my own life. The book is written as a compilation of short stories within one book with a chapter for every girl.

The first chapter title being; The Sun, the Moon and the Stars; the story of Magda and ending with The Cheater’s Guide to love where he tells the story based (maybe loosely) on the relationship and then subsequent one sided relationship he had with his Fiancee.

While many may see it as a true Cheater’s Guide to love because he describes with great detail all of the missteps Yunior made with women, I also see it as the ultimate description of how different each individual love could be and how sometimes we pass that up in search of something that we can not identify within ourselves.

Yunior’s story is one shared by many men and women who go through a lot of changes as they search for love, acceptance and hope in another person. It also shows how the way you were brought up greatly colors the way you interact with the opposite sex even if you don’t realize it.

A lot of the time, Yunior’s own critical thinking would give it away. He knew he was a man whore but idolized the end game as well and the unfortunate thing that most don’t realize that Yunior eventually did is that you can’t be both. Something will give and at some point, grand gestures of apology and expensive gifts will not be enough to even have someone return your phone call.

Yunior is a more the tragic anti hero in this, you can’t help but love him, understand him and want what’s best for him but you have to admit he’s made a lot of terrible decisions and hurt a lot of feelings along the way.

This is How You Lose Her cements Junot Diaz as a literary great in my mind. He’s my modern day V.S. Naipaul. It’s an amazing addition to my library and a book you know you’ll read again.

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